Thursday, October 21, 2021

Hailing From the Great State of Texas!

by Dick Bourne
Mid-Atlantic Gateway 

Part 1

Growing up in East Tennessee, I didn't know a whole lot about the geography of the state of Texas as a youngster. I knew it was big, but that's about it. But when I started regularly watching Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling on a regular basis in the early 1970s, that all changed for me.

I had an Atlas that my parents had given me and I loved looking up far away places and day-dreaming about what it would be like to go there. It seemed to me that more wrestlers came from the state of Texas than from any other state in the union. And from some very cool sounding places.

My first memory of being interested in learning about Texas was in 1976 during the year-long war between Paul Jones and Blackjack Mulligan over the United States Heavyweight Championship. Paul was from Port Arthur and Blackjack famously hailed from Eagle Pass, Texas. Both of these places sounded very exciting to me. Part of it was the way they were announced by WRAL TV ring announcer (and promoter) extraordinaire Joe Murnick:



These were the first Texas towns I heard about on wrestling that I remember looking up in my Atlas. I learned that Port Arthur was a relatively small town on the Gulf of Mexico, just east of Houston.

I looked up Eagle Pass, too, and saw that it was a small Mexican-border town about two and a half hours west of San Antonio on the Rio Grande river. But this confused me a bit, because Eagle Pass was nowhere near all the colorful places Blackjack talked about in his local promos. Blackjack always mentioned west Texas towns like Odessa, Abilene, Sweetwater, Midland, or Duvall County in the tales he would weave into the local promos for upcoming Mid-Atlantic area events. But that string of west Texas towns was along the I-20 corridor well over 300 miles north of Eagle Pass. This wasn't adding up.

I asked Blackjack about this once, asking how he came to be billed from Eagle Pass. He confessed that it just had an outlaw sound to it that he liked. And some of Mama Mulligan's kinfolk were from there, too, he said with a smile. Blackjack was always working.

So here is a short list of wrestlers that I watched in the 1970s and 1980s that hailed from the great state of Texas. It isn't a complete list by any means, just the ones I think of the most. I remember looking up all these hometowns in my trusty Atlas during those years. All of them seemed like magical places to me.


Blackjack Mulligan - Eagle Pass
Blackjack loved telling tall tales about the characters he encountered in Texas, many of them archived in our section of this website called Blackjack's Bar-b-que. Of all the wrestlers who hailed from Texas, none of them was more Texan in my eyes than the great Blackjack Mulligan. He set an early  record for the most U.S. title reigns, and was both a hated heel and beloved babyface during his seven years headlining our territory.

Paul Jones - Port Arthur 
Port Arthur always had this very cool, classy sound to it to me as a kid. And Paul Jones was that kind of babyface in his peak years for Jim Crockett Promotions in the 1970s. The quintessential good-guy fighting the uphill battle against the dangerous Texas villain Blackjack Mulligan. Their rivalry in the area is still remembered to this day. Paul held just about every title you could hold in our area, and was a main eventer here for over a decade.

Dick Murdoch - Waxahachie
When Dick Murdoch came for a multi-month stay in our area in 1978, he was billed from Waxahachie, Texas. It took me a while to learn how to spell it to be able to look it up on my Atlas! Waxahachie is just south of Dallas. Murdoch was later billed from Canyon, Texas, which is just south of Amarillo in the west Texas panhandle, and a much more appropriate place to be from given his ties to other west Texas wrestlers like Blackjack Mulligan, Dusty Rhodes, and the Funk brothers. But how cool is the name of a town like Waxahachie? Unforgettable.

Dusty Rhodes - Austin
I knew of Austin of course, being the state capitol of Texas. But it didn't have that same exotic feel to it that some of these lesser known Texas towns I was learning about. But for years I knew that Dusty was the "son of a plumber" from Austin, Texas. Rhodes made regular appearances in our area in the 1970s as a special attraction, similar to Andre the Giant. He was a semi-regular on the big cards held in Crockett's main town of Greensboro. In 1984, he came in full time as booker and led the company to heights it hadn't seen since the George Scott Mulligan/Flair/Steamboat era of the 1970s.

Dory Funk, Jr. and Terry Funk - Amarillo
Amarillo was always a fascinating place to me as a kid because it was where the famous Funk family originated from, and the Funks were wrestling royalty that you read about in all the wrestling magazines. They were the only two brothers to have ever held the NWA World Heavyweight championship and both had many title defense in our area. Real men came from places like Amarillo, Texas. I knew this for a fact.  Late addition: David Chappell reminds me that Dory Funk also worked under a mask as the Texas Outlaw and held the Mid-Atlantic title managed by Paul Jones.

Tiger Conway, Jr. - Houston
Conway was a breakout star here in 1975, teaming with rookie Steve Keirn to upset the world tag team champions, the Anderson Brothers, in a non-title match on television. He and his father had success in Houston, and were billed from that city while wrestling here.

Nelson Royal - Amarillo
Nelson's heyday was before my time as a fan, but he was always around, especially in the 1980s where he made a brief return as the mentor and tag partner of fellow Texan Sam Houston. I loved that Royal always looked like the quintessential Texas cowboy. He was actually originally from Kentucky and lived most of his life in North Carolina and was actually once billed as being from London, England! Our friend Carroll Hall seems to remember that when Nelson turned babyface in the mid-1960s and began teaming with Tex McKenzie, he was billed from Amarillo. Who can ever forget those cool vignettes beginning in December of 1985 when Nelson would invite us for a cup of coffee around the campfire to smarten us up on the Bunkhouse Stampede? During the 1980s he was billed from Mooresville, NC (his legit home), although he was seemingly always considered a Texan.

Wahoo McDaniel* - Midland
Wahoo is listed here with an asterisk because in our area he was primarily billed as being from Oklahoma, where he had great success playing college football at the University of Oklahoma. But occasionally he was billed as being from Midland, Texas, where he actually did grow up and graduated from high school. His father worked the oil fields there. Wahoo's little league coach in Midland was future U.S. president George H.W. Bush, part of another famous Texas family. Wahoo was occasionally billed from Houston, too. I'm guessing it was because his biggest early career success in pro-wrestling was working that city for promoter Paul Boesch. I remember how surprised I was learning later that Wahoo and Johnny Valentine had battled for years in Texas long before both were brought to the Mid-Atlantic area by booker George Scott. I just assumed as a kid that their first battles were in our area. Boy was I wrong about that.

Stan Hansen - Borger
My exposure to Stan "The Lariat" Hansen in the 1970s was from watching "Georgia Championship Wrestling" when Superstation WTCG-17 (which later became WTBS) first appeared on our local cable system in 1976 or 1977.  Gordon Solie always called him "the bad man from Borger, Texas." Borger is about 30 miles northeast of Amarillo in the Texas panhandle. Hansen only wrestled in the Mid-Atlantic area occasionally, most notably in a late-70s tag team tournament with partner Blackjack Mulligan, and as a NWA world tag team champion with partner Ole Anderson in 1982.

Bobby Duncum - Austin
Duncum had a big battle with Blackjack Mulligan in the early 1980s which always seem centered around their real and/or fabled history with each other in Texas. Whether it was in Texas bullrope matches or Texas death matches, they shed some blood in our rings, and it always seemed to be a fight over the love of some former Texas sweetheart like Sarah Joe Puckett. Or at least that's how I remember it. Mulligan and Duncum's promos were filled with west Texas references, and I always wondered if it was was part of the lore or was part of a shoot!

Jake Roberts
Jake "The Snake" Roberts came here in 1981, when he was a tall, lean and lanky Texas cowboy through and through, and had a great look in that regard. This was before he carried around a snake or had created the DDT or was possessed by the devil and all the rest.  I always liked the Texas cowboy version of Jake Roberts the best. He was later billed from Stone Mountain, Georgia, but in our area in the early 1980s he was billed from Texas, although I can't recall them ever saying where in Texas. (If you remember, let us know!)

Outlaw Ron Bass - Pampa 
I confess I never looked up Pampa on my Atlas, and never knew where it was until I saw it included on an exit sign driving on I-40 from Amarillo to Oklahoma City in 2011. Pampa is a tiny little town between the two. Booker Ole Anderson brought "Outlaw" Ron Bass in to our area in 1981 to fill the Texan role left vacant by the departure of Blackjack Mulligan, but because the two had such a similar persona, the fans never rallied around Bass here the way they always had ol' Mully. 

The Von Erich Brothers* - Denton
No wrestlers were more associated with the state of Texas in the 1980s than the Von Erich brothers. David and Kevin only wrestled once in the Mid-Atlantic area, in a tournament here, and so they have an asterisk beside their name, too. But they have to be on my list. Their syndicated TV show aired in many markets in our area, and even if you didn't see them on TV here, you were well aware of them through their endless coverage in the wrestling magazines. David Von Erich's nickname was "the Yellow Rose of Texas" which became younger brother Kerry Von Erich's symbol, too, after David's untimely passing. It was part of a memorable tribute to David when Kerry defeated Ric Flair for the NWA World Championship. The Von Erich exploits in the ring were primarily carried out in Dallas, Fort Worth, and surrounding areas, but the town always associated with them is Denton, some 20 miles north of the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

Tully Blanchard - San Antonio
Tully was always billed from San Antonio, and his father Joe Blanchard promoted wrestling there in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Joe Blanchard actually had some of the Crockett champions down to his territory to defend their titles occasionally (which we cover in part two of this series.) Tully first made a name in the Mid-Atlantic area in the late 1970s on the mid-card, but returned in 1984 and headlined here until leaving in 1988 for the WWF.  He also brought another notable Texan into the area in the mid-80s, Nickla "Baby Doll" Roberts, to accompany him as his "perfect 10."

Sam Houston - Houston
In the tradition of the "tall drink of water" cowboys like Jake Roberts a few years before him, Sam Houston personified the Texas cowboy image for Jim Crockett Promotions during the Dusty-era of JCP. (Dusty had assumed more of a "David Allen Coe truck-drivin' hat" persona in the mid-1980s.) I always thought Dusty had really big plans for Sam, but they never panned out for various reasons. Houston teamed with veteran Nelson Royal during those years, too, and that gave him even more Texas street cred.

Late Addition!
Black Bart - Pecos
"Dadgum!" I can't believe I left out Black Bart! Brian Rogers reminded me, and dadgum it, how can I not include a guy who yells "TEXAS!!" as he leaps from the second turnbuckle with a big legdrop! Bart was billed from Pecos, Texas, which is further west on out that I-20 corridor past Odessa. The former Ricky Harris in the Mid-Atlantic area in the early 1980s, Black Bart was one half of the Mid-Atlantic tag team champions with the aforementioned Ron Bass managed by James J. Dillon. He was National Champion as well. But my lasting memory of Bart was that Stan Hansen-esque primal yell of 'Texas!!" as he lept from the turnbuckle with that big leg drop. Sorry I forgot you to begin with, Bart!


Those are the wrestlers that I think of when I think of Texas wrestlers working for Jim Crockett Promotions in the 1970s and 1980s. I fully realize my list isn't complete. David Chappell, who has an incredible memory for details for things like this, sent me his list of wrestlers in our area who were billed as coming from Texas during his years watching JCP wrestling. He also admits he's probably left someone out, so if you can recall any others, please let us know.

CHAP'S LIST
Scott Casey, Sonny King, Paul Jones, Tiger Conway, Jr., Wahoo, Blackjack, Brian Adias, Baby Doll, Tully Blanchard, Bobby Duncum, Dory Funk, Jr., Terry Funk, Chavo Guerrero, Jr., Stan Hansen, Sam Houston, Killer Karl Kox, Dick Murdoch, Barry Orton, Dusty Rhodes, Jake Roberts, Richard Blood, Barry Windham, Mark Youngblood, Skandor Akbar, Bruiser Brody, Skip Young, Gary Young, Len Denton.

In 2011, I took a long road trip through the Southwestern and Midwestern United States. I met a good friend in Dallas and we went to the State Fair and rode the Texas Star. Afterwards I headed west through the oil and cotton country of west Texas, driving through towns like Abilene, Sweetwater, Midland and Odessa. Then I headed north into the panhandle through Lubbuck, Canyon, and Amarillo. This was Funk country, Rhodes and Murdoch country, Mulligan country. Throughout that beautiful drive, I heard the echos of bodyslams in the ring and the voices of Bob Caudle, Gordon Solie, and Joe Murnick naming those towns whenever they spoke of these great Texas legends. I treasure the memories of that adventure west.

In PART TWO of this "Texas Connections" feature, we'll take a look at some of the many times Jim Crockett's area championships were defended for other promoters in some of the Texas territories of the NWA including the NWA World Tag team titles, the U.S. title, and the NWA TV title.

Originally published October 31, 2017 on the Mid-Atlantic Gateway.

http://midatlanticwrestling.net/nwabelt.htm

Sunday, October 17, 2021

Final Match in Crockett Cup '85! Briscos vs. Rock-n-Roll Express

THE FINALS
by Mike Rickard

Mid-Atlantic Gateway Contributor 

UPDATED BRACKETS

THIS WEEK'S MATCH:
Rock-n-Roll Express vs. Jack & Jerry Brisco (Oklahoma Cowboys)

Tournament Final - 2 of 3 Falls
(Tournament Match #47 - First Fall)

The 1985 Jim Crockett Sr. Memorial Tag Team Tournament is underway. Wait, did you just say 1985? It’s time to take a look at one of wrestling’s biggest events from the mid-80s and see what it might have been like with a few historical alterations. What if Jim Crockett Promotions hosted its tag team tournament the Crockett Cup in 1985 and included teams from promotions outside the National Wrestling Alliance (“NWA”) including the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), the American Wrestling Association (AWA), New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW), All Japan Pro Wrestling, and more? In this case, you’d have 48 of the greatest tag teams in the world battling in a winner take all tournament for $1,000,000 and the prestigious Jim Crockett Sr. Memorial Cup Trophy. 

The first round saw 32 teams competing to advance to round two with 16 teams making it in. Round two followed as these 16 teams battled the 16 top-seeded tag teams that received a first-round bye. Round three continued with the remaining 16 teams slugging it out with eight making their way to round four. Round four saw things heat up further as eight teams battled to determine “The Final Four.” Now, two teams remain as only one team will walk away with $1,000,000 and the prestigious Jim Crockett Sr. Memorial Cup Trophy awaits. 

Sixth Round Rules: Special Stipulations Announced
Here are the rules for the round six of our tournament. While a pool of referees from the NWA, AWA, and WWF were appointed for the tournament’s first five rounds, things are going to be different this time around due to the wild finish to round five’s second match between the Fabulous Freebirds (Michael “P.S.” Hayes and Terry “Bam Bam” Gordy) and the Oklahoma Cowboys. There, Road Warrior Hawk and “Precious” Paul Ellering attempted to attack the Cowboys, with Hawk unmasking Roy as Jerry Brisco.  There’s a lot of confusion going on but announcers Bob Caudle and David Crockett will hopefully have some answers. 

The final match is taking place at the Greensboro Coliseum Complex in Greensboro, North Carolina on Sunday April 28. Let’s join Bob Caudle and David Crockett at ringside. The fans are cheering as the main event is about to take place. Bob Caudle says it’s the moment weeks in the making and that the fans will finally see who the best tag team in the world is. David Crockett says the tournament isn’t without controversy, but NWA President Jim Crockett wants to make sure things end conclusively and without outside interference. Bob adds he understands Jim Crockett Jr. has made special arrangements and asks David to explain them. David says that the match is going to be held in a steel cage with a special referee and a ringside enforcer. In addition, the match is two-out-of-three falls with no time limit. The only way to win a fall is by pinfall or submission. Andre the Giant serves as special ringside enforcer but he has no authority to officiate in the match or tell the referee if he sees any chicanery. 

Pre-Match Interviews
Bob Caudle tells David Crockett that Johnny Weaver met with the Brisco Brothers earlier at an undisclosed location. David Crockett adds Jack and Jerry have lots to worry about as Stan Hansen is gunning for them as are “Precious” Paul Ellering and Road Warrior Hawk. Jack and Jerry smirk as “The Buzzsaw” interviews them. Johnny asks the Briscos if they have anything to say for themselves. Jerry laughs and says, “We have a lot to say, but it boils down to this—we fooled everyone. We fooled you, we fooled the fans, and we fooled all the wrestlers who stepped into the ring with us.” Jack Brisco adds “Who said you can’t fool all of the people all the time?” Jack laughs and tells Johnny “They say we’re wild and we’re mean and we’re creating a scene. We’ve gone crazy. Let me tell you something Johnny Weaver, the Briscos are one step away from the million dollars and the Crockett Cup and there’s no way two long-haired punks like the Rock-n-Roll Express are going to beat them.” Jerry adds that he and his brother were world champions when Morton and Gibson were stealing hubcaps. Jack finishes by saying “We’ve been wrestling Oklahoma tornadoes for years and the Express won’t know what hit them.” 

Tony Schiavone is backstage with Ricky Morton and Robert Gibson of the Rock-n-Roll Express. Tony asks how it feels to be one step away from tag team immortality? Ricky tells Tony the fans know the Rock-n-Roll Express don’t make promises they can’t keep. It’s been a difficult battle as they’ve faced three of the toughest teams in professional wrestling today. They know the biggest obstacle is ahead with those two snakes the Brisco Brothers, but with the fans still standing behind them, they know they can win. Robert says the fans in the Mid-Atlantic region have welcomed them like they’re their own and they won’t let them down tonight. Ricky adds that after he and Robert have won the tournament, they’re going to show the fans how they rock and roll all night and party every day. Rock-n-roll will never die!

The Rock-n-Roll Express (Ricky Morton and Robert Gibson)
vs. The Brisco Brothers (Jack and Jerry Brisco)

The ring announcer tells the fans that a guest referee has been appointed—eight-time NWA World Heavyweight Champion Harley Race. Serving as the special enforcer outside the cage—“The Eighth Wonder of the World” Andre the Giant. David Crockett says the tournament has seen some wild moments but if those two men can’t maintain order, who can? Bob Caudle notes it’s apparent that NWA President Jim Crockett Jr. wants this tournament to end with no interference and with a conclusive winner. The announcer introduces the first team, Jack and Jerry Brisco. The Brisco Brothers jog out to the ring and they’re all smiles. The fans boo the Briscos. Next are the Rock-n-Roll Express who come out to Kiss’ “Rock-n-Roll All Night.” The crowd is near-deafening. 

Jack starts the match against Ricky Morton. The two lock up with a collar-and-elbow tie-up but Brisco quickly applies a Fireman’s Carry. Waist-lock attempt by Jack, but Ricky counters with a go-behind and slams Brisco down to the mat. Ricky goes after Jack, but the former NWA World Heavyweight Champion catches him with an arm drag. A second arm drag sends Morton down as Brisco quickly follows up with a bodyslam. Jack laughs and motions for Morton to lock up again. David Crockett says he doesn’t know if it’s a good idea for Ricky Morton to try and match wrestling holds with someone the calibre of Jack Brisco. The two go to lock up again but Ricky catches Jack in a side headlock. Brisco tries to run the ropes, but Morton puts the breaks on. Snapmare as Morton takes Jack down to the mat and reapplies the side headlock. Brisco is complaining that Morton grabbed the hair. Referee Harley Race does a quick check but doesn’t do anything. Bob Caudle says Ricky Morton is showing he has some mat wrestling skills of his own. 

The two tumblers lock up again as Ricky arm drags Jack. Jack gets up and Ricky goes for an arm bar but Brisco slugs him with a forearm. Elbow to the head as Jack whips Ricky into the Briscos’ corner. Tag to Jerry. The Briscos deliver a double hip toss to Ricky. Jerry whips him into the heel corner and tags Jack in. The Briscos both whip Morton into the corner then deliver a double body slam. Side suplex by Jack as he covers Morton for a two-count. Snapmare by Jack as he applies a front facelock, taking Ricky down to the mat. Ricky scrambles to escape as Jack applies the pressure. Ricky gets to his feet but Brisco grabs the hair, pulling him down. Harley Race sees it and warns Brisco he’ll disqualify him if he sees it again. Bob Caudle says there are no disqualifications in this match so Harley is either confused or trying to bluff the Briscos. David Crockett says Harley Race has bent or broken a few rules in his day which means he’s more apt to spot infractions. Brisco rakes Morton’s eyes then whips him into the heel corner yet again. Tag to Jerry who delivers a kneelift to Morton. Jerry applies an abdominal stretch in the center of the ring. Morton is in trouble. Bob Caudle notes that the Briscos have been working Ricky over for some time and the longer he stays in that hold, the more likely it is he could get hurt. David says that with this being a two-out-of-three falls match, the last thing the Rock-and-Roll Express want is to go into the second fall with one or both of them injured.  

Ricky is struggling to escape but Jerry has the hold locked in tight. Things are looking bad for Morton but the fans begin rallying, clapping their hands as they chant “rock and roll, rock and roll!” In an incredible display of willpower and balance, Ricky hip-tosses his way free, sending Jerry to the mat. Ricky tumbles and rolls to his corner ring as Jack Brisco runs in to intercept him. Hot tag to Robert who dropkicks Jack, knocking him down. Jerry gets up and eats a dropkick as well as Ricky staggers in his corner. 

Jack and Jerry go after Robert but he grabs their heads and delivers a double noggin-knocker. Ricky comes in as Robert takes Jack and Ricky takes Jerry. The Rock-n-Roll Express whip the Briscos into each other, knocking them down as Harley Race starts a five count. Ricky gets back to his corner as Jack staggers back to his. Bodyslam by Robert followed by a flying head scissors. Robert whips Jerry into the ropes and goes for a dropkick, but Jerry holds onto the ropes, with Gibson landing on his head. Jerry hits Robert with a big left then whips him towards Jack, who has a boot outstretched. Tag to Jack as the Brisco lift Robert up for a double suplex, driving him down hard into the mat. Near-fall but Gibson is still in it. Jack stomps Gibson in the back then rolls him over, dropping an elbow on his knee. Tag to Jerry as Jack holds Gibson’s leg. Jerry dives off the second rope with an elbow to Gibson’s knee before Morton can get in. Morton starts slugging away on Jack and Jerry as Harley Race makes him get back to his corner. David Crockett says Harley Race is an eight-time world heavyweight champion but as a referee, he stinks. Bob Caudle tells David that maybe someday he’ll get a chance to step into the ring as a referee. Meanwhile, the Briscos whips Gibson head-first into the cage as he falls to the mat. Jerry drops another elbow on Gibson’s leg then applies the Indian Deathlock. However, Ricky comes in and stomps Jerry in the head. Ricky picks Jerry up and whips him into the ropes, dropkicking him down to the mat. Harley Race forces Ricky back to his corner and as he does, Jack lifts Robert up for an atomic drop and crotches him on the top rope. Jerry gets Race’s attention as Jack covers Gibson for a three-count while Gibson wonders if he’ll be singing soprano for the rest of his life. David Crockett is flabbergasted at the injustice that just took place. The Briscos have stolen the first fall and now they’re one win away from the million-dollar prize and prestigious Crockett Cup trophy. 

Fall One Winners: The Brisco Brothers (25 minutes and 3 seconds)

David Crockett is right. With one fall under their belt, the Briscos are in the catbird seat as we head to the second fall. Be sure to come back for the remaining installment in the 1985 Crockett Cup tournament!

* * * * * * * * * * * *

PREVIOUS POSTS
IN THE CROCKETT CUP '85 FANTASY SERIES


SIXTH ROUND MATCH (TOURNAMENT FINAL)
[ Brackets ]

Sixth Round Match (Tournament Match #47)
     Rock-n-Roll Express vs. Oklahoma Cowboys (Briscos)
     First Fall   |   Second Fall   |   Third Fall (If Necessary)


FIFTH
ROUND MATCHES (SEMI-FINALS)

Fifth Round: Match 1 (Tournament Match #45)
  
  Rock-n-Roll Express vs. Midnight Express
Fifth Round: Match 2 (Tournament Match #46)
  
  The Fabulous Freebirds vs. The Oklahoma Cowboys


FOURTH
ROUND MATCHES (QUARTER FINALS)
[ Preview ]

Fourth Round: Match 1 (Tournament Match #41)
    
The Rock & Roll Express vs. Ole and Arn Anderson
Fourth Round: Match 2 (Tournament Match #42)

     Midnight Express vs. British Bulldogs
Fourth Round: Match 3 (Tournament Match #43)
    Brody/Hansen vs. The Oklahoma Cowboys
Fourth Round: Match 4 (Tournament Match #44)
    Rhodes & Murdoch vs. The Fabulous Freebirds


THIRD ROUND MATCHES
[ Scouting Report ] [ Brackets ]

Third Round: Match 1 (Tournament Match #33)
     The Rock & Roll Express vs. The Russians
Third Round: Match 2 (Tournament Match #34)
     Ole & Arn Anderson vs. Antonio Inoki and Seiji Sakaguchi
Third Round: Match 3 (Tournament Match #35)
     Midnight Express vs. High Flyers
Third Round: Match 4 (Tournament Match #36)
     Kevin and Mike Von Erich vs. The British Bulldogs
Third Round: Match 5 (Tournament Match #37)
     Road Warriors vs. Brody and Hansen
Third Round: Match 6 (Tournament Match #38)
     Funk Brothers vs. Oklahoma Cowboys
Third Round: match #7 (Tournament Match #39)
    Texas Outlaws vs. Iron Sheik/Nikolai Volkoff
Third Round: match #8 (Tournament Match #40)

    Fantastics vs. Freebirds


SECOND ROUND MATCHES
Second Round: Matches 1 & 2 (Tournament 17 & 18)

     Mulligan/McDaniel vs. The Russians
    Rock & Roll Express vs. Maharishi/Nagasaki
Second Round: Matches 3 & 4 (Tournament 19 & 20)
    Brown/Jannetty vs. Inoki & Sakaguchi
    Ole & Arn Anderson vs. Windham/Rotunda)
Second Round: Matches 5 & 6 (Tournament 21 & 22)

    Midnight Express vs. Hart Foundation
    PYT Express vs. High Flyers
Second Round: Matches 7 & 8 (Tournament 23 & 24) 
    Rude/Barr (with Percy Pringle III) vs. Kevin and Mike Von Erich
    Fujinami/Kimura vs. British Bulldogs
Second Round: Matches 9 & 10 (Tournament 25 & 26)
    Brody/Hansen vs. Williams/DiBiase
    Road Warriros vs. Lawler/Dundee
Second Round: Matches 11 & 12 (Tournament 27 & 28)
    Piper & Orton vs. The Oklahoma Cowboys
    The Funk Brothers vs. The Younglood Brothers
Second Round: Matches 13 & 14 (Tournament 29 & 30)
    Rhodes/Murdoch vs. Adams/Hernandez
    Sheik/Volkoff vs. Steamboat/Snuka
Second Round: Matches 15 & 16 (Tournament 31 & 32)
    Fantastics vs. Fabulous Ones
    Sheepherders vs. Freebirds


FIRST ROUND MATCHES

First Round: Matches 1 & 2
    Hennig/Blackwell vs. Mulligan/McDaniel
    Tyler/Whatley vs. Maharishi/Nagasaki
First Round: Matches 3 & 4
    Windham/Rotunda vs. Bockwinkel/Saito
    Rougeaus vs. Inoki/Sakaguchi
First Round: Matches 5 &6
    Barbarian/Graham vs. Hart Foundation (Hart/Neidhart)
    High Flyers (Brunzell/Gagne) vs. Savage/Poffo
First Round: Matches 7 & 8:
    The Von Erich vs. Blanchard/Abdullah the Butcher
    Tenryu/Tsuruta vs. The British Bulldogs
First Round: Matches 9 & 10:
    Graham/Blair vs. DiBiase/Williams
    Valiant/McGraw vs. Lawler/Dundee
First Round: Matches 11 & 12:
    Piper/Orton vs. Patterson/Fernandez
    Rock & Roll RPMs vs. Youngblood Brothers
First Round: Matches 13 and 14:
    Dynamic Duo (Gino & Chris) vs. American Starship
    Sawyer Bros. vs. Steamboat/Snuka
First Round: Matches 15 and 16
    Batten Twins vs. Fabulous Ones
    Weaver/Houston vs. Sheepherders

Original Tournament Announcement (May 2020)
Seedings and First Round Pairings Announced

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Sunday, October 10, 2021

Ricky Steamboat Returns to Norfolk (2015)


Ricky Steamboat made a return to Norfolk, VA recently in an appearance for Big Time Wrestling at the Norfolk Scope.

Prior to the event Eric Stace and Eddie Cheslock met Ricky in front of the famous Scope Coliseum, site of so many great Mid-Atlantic Wrestling events over the years, including yearly cards on Thanksgiving night in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s. They took some photographs of the former NWA world champion with a replica of the belt he wore in 1989.

Thanks to those guys for allowing us to post this great photograph here on the Gateway. Thanks also to promoter Tony Hunter who helped make all that possible.

Ricky Steamboat with the book
"United States Championship"
George Pantas interviewed Ricky Steamboat for the Norfolk Navy Flagship in advance of his appearance in Norfolk. You can find links to that interview (which contains lots of Mid-Atlantic discussion) here.

Also, our buddy George South had a chance to spend some time with Ricky before the Norfolk event and show him our new book on the United States Championship. He posted some comments about that on his website. George reports that Ricky loved the book and asked for a copy, which you just better believe is on the way soon. (You kidding me?)

George wrote:
We spent 30 minutes talking about the U.S. belt! He remembered that "heavyweight" was misspelled on the belt and loved seeing all those photos of it again. He marked out a little remembering working with Buddy Rogers in one of the U.S. tournaments. And got mad that Slaughter put new leather on the black belt! haha

Steamboat held the U.S. championship on several occasions in the 1970s and 1980s, trading the title with the likes of Ric Flair, Blackjack Mulligan, Wahoo McDaniel, and Dick Slater.

For more information on the book about Jim Crockett's United States Championship and the five belts that represented it, click here.


Originally published  in November 2015 on the Mid-Atlantic Gateway.

Wednesday, October 06, 2021

Super Bowl Winning Quarterback Brad Johnson and Ten Pounds of Gold

Super Bowl XXXVII winning quarterback
Brad Johnson


by Dick Bourne
Mid-Atlantic Gateway


What a great photograph of former NFL (and Super Bowl winning) quarterback Brad Johnson with his copy of our book Ten Pounds of Gold

Turns out Brad is a big fan of (and was a friend of) former NWA World Heavyweight Champion Jack Brisco, the legendary collegiate and pro wrestling champion in the 1970s who is spotlighted in the book.  The two became friends while both lived in Tampa. Jack had retired from wrestling and was running the famed Brisco Brothers Body Shop with brother Jerry. Brad had just won Super Bowl XXXVII with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.   

Mutual friend Bill Murdock, who wrote Brisco's biography, sent me this photo from Brad. 

Bill actually introduced Brad and Jack to each other in 2003 in Tampa at a dinner Bill organized at Flemming's Steakhouse. It was an appropriate spot to have dinner: the restaurant just happened to be a in close proximity to both the Brisco Brothers Body Shop as well as Raymond James Stadium, the NFL home of the Tampa Bay Bucs. 

Brad and Bill both grew up in the Asheville, NC area and had been friends for some time. When Bill was in Florida working on Brisco's book with Jack, they decided to all get together. Bill related that as much as Brad had wanted to meet childhood hero Brisco, Jack was equally excited to meet Brad. The Brisco brothers had owned Bucs season tickets since 1976, when the team was first established in the NFL. There was obviously great excitement that summer of 2003 over the Bucs win of the Super Bowl just a few months earlier.

Brad is a 17-year veteran of the National Football League and was the winning quarterback for Coach Jon Gruden and the Tampa Bay Bucs in Superbowl XXXVII in January of 2003. In that game, Brad threw for 215 yards and two touchdowns in the 48-21 victory over the Oakland Raiders.

Not only did he quarterback for the Bucs, he also played for the Minnesota Vikings, Washington Redskins, and the Dallas Cowboys. His NFL career stretched from 1992 through 2008. In fact, I saw him play in person when he was quarterback for Washington, along with my buddy David Chappell and his cousin Jamie, on a road trip to see the Redskins play the Carolina Panthers at Fed-Ex Field on a very warm day in September of 2000. (Redskins won 20-17. The Gateway was barely a month old at the time!)

Brad played his college ball for Coach Bobby Bowden at Florida State University back in the days when FSU was a perennial top-5 independent powerhouse before joining the ACC. During Brad's four years there (1988-1991), Florida State was a combined 42-7, and had bowl victories all four years including the Cotton, Fiesta, and Sugar Bowls. He was the back-up for Casey Weldon in those years, but it is a testament to the level and depth of quarterback play at FSU during that time that the back-up quarterback goes on to have a 17-year career in the NFL, including a Super Bowl win. 

It's actually a really great story. 

My thanks to Bill Murdock, and especially to Brad Johnson for a photograph I will treasure always.  

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Utterly Amazing!
You can follow "Big Bad" Brad Johnson on Twitter at @Brad_Johnson_14, where you will find some of the most amazing trick basketball and football shots you have ever seen. The guy is a magician. Check out the compilation in this recent Twitter post:

 

Check out Ten Pounds of Gold in the Mid-Atlantic Gateway Book Store. Written with "Ace of Belts" Dave Millican, it is a close look at the fabled championship belt that represented the NWA World Championship from 1973-1986, worn by champions like Jack Brisco, Harley Race, and Ric Flair. 

TenPoundsOfGold.com

Joe Furr

OnlineWorldOfWrestling

Greenville SC Memories
by Don Holbrook
Mid-Atlantic Gateway Contributor

About Joe Furr, one night in Greenville I had a long talk with him. He had already wrestled and came back up and was standing at the back. He said he was just “waiting for his ride” but at the conclusion of the main event that night they had a big run-in with all the guys out to try to pull Wahoo McDaniel and Super Destroyer apart.

Also, Joe Furr was kin to Jim Grabmire.  They were either uncle and nephew or they were cousins. Cannot remember which.

But anyway, Furr was an interesting fellow. Don’t know if any of you knew him or ever talked with him but he was a guy who’s voice didn’t sound like you would think it would. Gruff, so much so I almost asked him if he had laryngitis. He talked about how much he loved it here, more than any area he had worked.  

Apparently George Scott liked him because after George went to New York to book, Furr worked there for a bit.

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More Memories from Don Holbrook
Don Holbrook is an occasional Gateway contributor as well as a history buff on late 1960s and 1970s wrestling in Greenville, SC. His mother worked for years in the Greenville Memorial Auditorium office and Don spent many afternoons hanging out there as a kid, as well as lurking around the entire place during those legendary Monday night cards every week in Greenville. He became known to all those in charge, which later gave him lots of great access and some great stories to tell.

Tuesday, October 05, 2021

Crockett Cup '85 Semi-Final #2: Freebirds vs. Oklahoma Cowboys

THE SEMI-FINALS
by Mike Rickard

Mid-Atlantic Gateway Contributor 

UPDATED BRACKETS

THIS WEEK'S MATCH:
The Feeebirds vs. The Oklahoma Cowboys

Semi-Final Match #2
(Tournament Match #46)

The 1985 Jim Crockett Sr. Memorial Tag Team Tournament is underway. Wait, did you just say 1985? It’s time to take a look at one of wrestling’s biggest events from the mid-80s and see what it might have been like with a few historical alterations. What if Jim Crockett Promotions hosted its tag team tournament the Crockett Cup in 1985 and included teams from promotions outside the National Wrestling Alliance (“NWA”) including the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), the American Wrestling Association (AWA), New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW), All Japan Pro Wrestling, and more? In this case, you’d have 48 of the greatest tag teams in the world battling in a winner take all tournament for $1,000,000 and the prestigious Jim Crockett Sr. Memorial Cup Trophy. 

The first round saw 32 teams competing to advance to round two with 16 teams making it in. Round two followed as these 16 teams battled the 16 top-seeded tag teams that received a first-round bye. Round three continued with the remaining 16 teams slugging it out with eight making their way to round four. Round four saw things heat up further as eight teams battled to determine “The Final Four.” Now, four teams remain as things get even closer to the final round where $1,000,000 and the prestigious Jim Crockett Sr. Memorial Cup Trophy awaits. 

Fifth Round Rules:
Here are the rules for the round five of our tournament. A pool of referees from the NWA, AWA, and WWF have been appointed for the tournament and randomly selected for each match. The fifth-round matches have a sixty-minute time limit and are sanctioned under NWA rules (throwing an opponent over the top rope is an automatic disqualification). The matches are one fall with a win obtained by a pinfall, submission, count-out, or disqualification. 

The fifth-round matches and the finals are being held at the Greensboro Coliseum Complex in Greensboro, North Carolina. The fifth-round matches will take place on Saturday April 27 and the final match on Sunday April 28. Your commentators for the matches are Bob Caudle and David Crockett, but as always, you never know when a special guest will show up. 

The Rock-n-Roll Express (Robert Gibson and Ricky Morton) defeated Jim Cornette’s Midnight Express (“Beautiful” Bobby Eaton and “Loverboy” Dennis Condrey) in the first match of round five and now it’s time to see who will face the Rock-n-Roll Express in the finals. The mystery team known as the Oklahoma Cowboys (Tex and Roy) are scheduled to face the Fabulous Freebirds.

Pre-Match Interviews
Bob Caudle tells David Crockett that Johnny Weaver is ready to interview the Oklahoma Cowboys. However, when the camera gets backstage, the Cowboys are nowhere to be seen. Instead, Paul Ellering and Road Warrior Hawk are backstage with Johnny Weaver. Ellering states NWA President Jim Crockett Jr. hasn’t done anything with the information he’s brought him so he’s going to handle things himself.  Johnny Weaver says that Mr. Crockett has already made it known that if anything happens to disrupt the tournament, the Road Warriors will be fined $250,000 and barred from the National Wrestling Alliance for one year. Ellering says his men are going to do what they have to do to get revenge on the team of Bruiser Brody and Stan Hansen for injuring Animal, but that will happen down the road. Tonight, they’re going to prove the Oklahoma Cowboys set them up for the attack on Stan Hansen—even if they have to beat it out of Tex and Roy. 

Tony Schiavone is backstage with the Fabulous Freebirds. Michael Hayes says it looks like people are finally start to understand what Badstreet is all about. The further you go down the block, the badder things get. They just beat up those two Texas Outlaws and now they’re ready to teach the Oklahoma Plowboys a lesson. Tony points out the Freebirds’ Buddy Roberts used a metal water pitcher to win the match. Roberts says Dusty Rhodes looked thirsty so he offered him a drink. Hayes looks at Gordy and asks “’Bam Bam’ you know only two things come out of Oklahoma, right?” Gordy laughs and Schiavone says he doesn’t like where this is going. Hayes laughs and says when the Freebirds are done with this tournament, there’s a lot people won’t be liking.

The Oklahoma Cowboys come out to mostly boos. David Crockett points out that Tex and Roy keep looking over their shoulders. Bob Caudle says both men have made some dangerous enemies. David wonders if this will affect the Cowboys’ ability to focus on the match at hand. The song “Freebird” plays as David Crockett tells Bob Caudle it’s one of his favorite songs from the 1960s. Bob tells David there were many great songs from the 60s, but “Freebird” was released as a single in 1974. The crowd boos as Hayes, Gordy, and Roberts trot out to the ring. David Crockett says the Freebirds didn’t win over any fans with the way they beat the Texas Outlaws in round four. Bob adds, “That’s right David and this is going to be a real battle of the bullies.”

The Oklahoma Cowboys (Tex and Roy) vs. The Fabulous Freebirds (Michael “P.S.” Hayes and Terry “Bam Bam” Gordy) with Buddy Roberts
Bob Caudle reminds the fans that thanks to the Freebird Rule, any two Freebirds can wrestle in this match and here it will be Hayes and Gordy taking on the Cowboys. Hayes starts off against Tex. World Class Championship Wrestling referee David Manning will be officiating this match. Manning advises both teams on the rules then signals for the bell. 

Michael Hayes starts off against Tex. Collar and elbow tie-up as both men vie for control. Tex manages to back Hayes up against the ropes. Referee Manning signals for a clean break and Tex gives it to Hayes. The two men lock up again with Rex again backing Hayes up against the ring ropes. Manning signals for a clean break but Tex goes to drop a forearm across Hayes’ chest. However, Hayes gets out of the way and as Tex’ forearm bounces off the ropes, Hayes grabs his opponent in a side headlock. Hayes applies the pressure and keeps the hold locked in for a minute before Tex is able to bounce off the ropes and escape. Hayes catches Tex off the ropes with a shoulderblock, knocking him down to the mat. Hayes drops an elbow on Tex then picks him up, bodyslamming him. Hayes picks up Tex and whips him into the ‘Birds’ corner where Terry Gordy is waiting with an outstretched boot. Tag to “Bam Bam” as the ‘Birds whip Tex into the ropes, delivering a double elbow to Tex’ chest. Tex falls to the mat as Gordy covers him for a two count. Gordy goes for a front facelock but Tex fires off a big left. Gordy responds with a right hand, knocking Tex into a neutral corner. Gordy whips Tex into the Freebirds’ corner and tags in Hayes. David Crockett says in just five minutes the Freebirds have isolated Tex and look to be on their way to a quick win. Bob Caudle says the Cowboys may be distracted by the threat hanging over their head. David says that Ellering and Hawk’s threat is like the Sword of Damascus. Bob Caudle points out that David’s allusion is particularly apt, but that he’s probably thinking of the Sword of Damocles. David looks at Bob and asks, “Gosh, Bob is there anything you don’t know?” David observes that the Freebirds’ teamwork is amazing. Gordy tags Hayes. Gordy grabs Tex by the arms as Hayes jumps off the second rope with an elbow knocking Tex down. Cover on Tex but he’s close to the ropes and puts his foot on the rope, forcing a break to the count. 

Hayes goes to whip Tex into the ropes but Tex reverses! Tex goes for a hip toss, but Hayes blocks it and reverses with a hip toss of his own. Hayes does the Moonwalk as some of the fans cheer. David Crockett says the Freebirds’ philosophy rubs people the wrong way, but they don’t mind seeing them beat down the Cowboys. Tex charges at Hayes but Hayes delivers an arm drag takedown. Hayes goes back to the side headlock as Tex fights to get to his feet. David points out Tex seems frantic now. Tex is in the side headlock, but he forces his way into the Cowboys’ corner. Tag to Roy. Roy comes in, ready to deliver an axe-handle, but “P.S.” mule kicks him and starts throwing punches. Knee to the back by Tex sends Hayes through the ropes onto the floor. Tex gets back to his corner as Roy goes out and gives a complimentary back adjustment to Hayes by bodyslamming him on the concrete. Buddy Roberts comes over but doesn’t do anything. Bob Caudle says Buddy would love to interfere but he doesn’t want to see him and his fellow Freebirds knocked out of the tournament on a disqualification. Roy whips Hayes into the ring and tags in Tex. Both men grab one of Hayes’ arms and sling him into their corner. Tag to Roy. Roy picks up Hayes and drops his back across Tex’ knee. Cover on Hayes but Roy only gets a two count. Roy picks up Hayes and rams his head into the top turnbuckle. Tag to Tex who comes off the second rope with an elbow to Hayes’ head as Roy restrains the Freebird. Tex grabs Hayes’ right leg and drops an elbow on it. Tex places Hayes’ leg on the bottom rope and drops a knee on it. Tex pulls Hayes into the center of the ring and drops an elbow onto Hayes’ right knee. Kneebar by Tex on Hayes. Hayes manages to reach the ropes, forcing a break. Tex stomps at Hayes’ right knee then lifts him up, delivering a shin-breaker. Hayes holds onto the top rope to try and gain his balance but Tex clips him in the right knee, sending Hayes down to the mat. Terry Gordy has enough and comes in slugging away at Tex. The referee grabs Gordy and orders him to his corner, but the big man isn’t going anywhere.

While Manning contends with Gordy, Tex holds Hayes’ right leg and Roy drops an elbow onto it from the second rope. Tag to Roy, who goes to work twisting Freebird Hayes’ right leg. Hayes flails away with punches but can’t connect with Roy. Roy picks up Hayes and delivers a vertical suplex. Cover by Roy, but Gordy runs in to break up the pin. Referee David Manning watches as Gordy goes back to his corner. Roy drags Hayes by the bum leg and tags in Tex. Tex delivers an under-hook suplex to Hayes and goes for the cover again. Gordy comes in but Roy is there to beat him to the punch. Actually, more like get punched as “Bam Bam” clobbers him with a big right hand. Manning argues with Gordy and Roy and as he does, Buddy Roberts gets on the mat apron, yelling at Tex. Tex swings at Roberts, but Buddy blocks the punch and connects, knocking Tex down. David Crockett says he’s heard of the twelfth man in football and the Freebirds have the third man. Seeing his opportunity, a dazed Michael Hayes crawls towards the center of the ring. The referee tells Roy to get back in his corner as Gordy sees Hayes trying to make the tag. Gordy gets back to his corner and watches as David Manning forces Roy back into his corner. Tex gets to his feet and dives after Hayes, but Gordy has pulled Hayes back to the Freebirds’ corner. Bob Caudle admires the clever tactics by Gordy. He says that when teams have been together as long as the Freebirds have, it’s almost like they have telepathy. Manning turns around as Hayes tags in “Bam Bam” and the crowd erupts in cheers. 

Tex is on his hands and knees begging for mercy. Gordy kicks him in the gut then lifts him up with a big scoop slam. Gordy bounces off the ropes and drops an elbow on Tex. Cover but he only gets a two count. Gordy delivers a swinging neckbreaker to Tex and covers him again. This time, Roy runs in and makes the save. Gordy gets up and whips Roy into a neutral corner. Michael Hayes is back on his feet and Gordy makes the tag. The Freebirds whip Tex into the ropes and Hayes delivers a back body drop and Gordy catches Tex, going for a reverse piledriver. However, Roy clips Gordy in the knee and Gordy and Tex go down. Hayes is still nursing his weakened right leg but grabs Roy. It’s an all-out brawl now as all four wrestlers are looking for the edge while David Manning struggles to restore order. “Bam Bam” is unloading with forearm smashes across the chest of Tex. On the other side of the ring, Hayes has Roy in the corner and he’s slugging away. The fans begin screaming as David Crockett asks what’s going on. Bob Caudle points out that Paul Ellering and Road Warrior Hawk are on their way to the ring and neither man looks happy. The Oklahoma Cowboys don’t see either man as they’re too busy fighting the ‘Birds. Buddy Roberts doesn’t know what to make of the situation so he grabs a chair. Hawk comes close to Buddy who swings the chair, only for Hawk to get out of the way and Roberts smashes the chair into the ring post instead. Hawk slugs Roberts then rams his head into the mat apron. “Bam Bam” sees this and goes out after Hawk. The two brawl as Paul Ellering says something and points to the Cowboys. Gordy isn’t listening and continues fighting with Hawk. Ellering grabs the chair and smashes it over Gordy’s back. Hawk rams Gordy’s head into the steel post. The Road Warrior sees Tex and points his finger at him. The fans cheer as a number of preliminary wrestlers run out. Rocky Kernodle, the Italian Stallion, Joel Deaton, and Ben Alexander try to restrain Hawk and Ellering but they aren’t having an easy go of it. Back in the ring, Tex blindsides Hayes, clipping him in his weakened leg. Tex locks in the Indian Deathlock as Gordy fights through the preliminary wrestlers to get back into the ring. As he does, Roy stomps him in the head. The referee checks on Hayes who seems passed out and the with Hayes’ shoulders down, the referee counts 1-2-3 as the Cowboys score a controversial win. 

Winners: The Oklahoma Cowboys 

Terry Gordy stumbles into the ring and goes after Tex. Roy runs over and clobbers Gordy with a knee that knocks him back out of the ring, but Road Warrior Hawk reaches into the ring and grabs Roy’s mask. More wrestlers are running in as the Cowboys look for an exit. David Crockett points out it looks like Ricky Steamboat, Jimmy Valiant, Bugsy McGraw, and Jimmy Snuka are here. Hawk continues pulling at Roy and nearly has him out of the ring. However, Roy’s mask comes off and Hawk gives a shocked look as do all the fans. It’s one of the Brisco Brothers! The Cowboys use their window of opportunity and slide out of the ring, running for their lives as the wrestlers restrain Ellering and Hawk. Gordy checks on Hayes as Roberts staggers into the ring. 

Round five is over but what will happen in the finals as the Rock-n-Roll Express face the Oklahoma Cowboys? Be sure to join us next time for the fateful finale.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

PREVIOUS POSTS IN THE CROCKETT CUP '85 FANTASY SERIES

Original Tournament Announcement (May 2020)

Seedings and First Round Pairings Announced

FIFTH ROUND MATCHES (SEMI-FINALS)
[ Brackets ]

 Fifth Round: Match 1 (Tournament Match #45)
  
  Rock-n-Roll Express vs. Midnight Express
Fifth Round: Match 2 (Tournament Match #46)
  
  The Fabulous Freebirds vs. The Oklahoma Cowboys


FOURTH
ROUND MATCHES (QUARTER FINALS)
[ Preview ] [ Brackets ]

Fourth Round: Match 1 (Tournament Match #41)
    
The Rock & Roll Express vs. Ole and Arn Anderson
Fourth Round: Match 2 (Tournament Match #42)

     Midnight Express vs. British Bulldogs
Fourth Round: Match 3 (Tournament Match #43)
    Brody/Hansen vs. The Oklahoma Cowboys
Fourth Round: Match 4 (Tournament Match #44)
    Rhodes & Murdoch vs. The Fabulous Freebirds


THIRD ROUND MATCHES
[ Scouting Report ] [ Brackets ]

Third Round: Match 1 (Tournament Match #33)
     The Rock & Roll Express vs. The Russians
Third Round: Match 2 (Tournament Match #34)
     Ole & Arn Anderson vs. Antonio Inoki and Seiji Sakaguchi
Third Round: Match 3 (Tournament Match #35)
     Midnight Express vs. High Flyers
Third Round: Match 4 (Tournament Match #36)
     Kevin and Mike Von Erich vs. The British Bulldogs
Third Round: Match 5 (Tournament Match #37)
     Road Warriors vs. Brody and Hansen
Third Round: Match 6 (Tournament Match #38)
     Funk Brothers vs. Oklahoma Cowboys
Third Round: match #7 (Tournament Match #39)
    Texas Outlaws vs. Iron Sheik/Nikolai Volkoff
Third Round: match #8 (Tournament Match #40)

    Fantastics vs. Freebirds


SECOND ROUND MATCHES
Second Round: Matches 1 & 2 (Tournament 17 & 18)

     Mulligan/McDaniel vs. The Russians
    Rock & Roll Express vs. Maharishi/Nagasaki
Second Round: Matches 3 & 4 (Tournament 19 & 20)
    Brown/Jannetty vs. Inoki & Sakaguchi
    Ole & Arn Anderson vs. Windham/Rotunda)
Second Round: Matches 5 & 6 (Tournament 21 & 22)

    Midnight Express vs. Hart Foundation
    PYT Express vs. High Flyers
Second Round: Matches 7 & 8 (Tournament 23 & 24) 
    Rude/Barr (with Percy Pringle III) vs. Kevin and Mike Von Erich
    Fujinami/Kimura vs. British Bulldogs
Second Round: Matches 9 & 10 (Tournament 25 & 26)
    Brody/Hansen vs. Williams/DiBiase
    Road Warriros vs. Lawler/Dundee
Second Round: Matches 11 & 12 (Tournament 27 & 28)
    Piper & Orton vs. The Oklahoma Cowboys
    The Funk Brothers vs. The Younglood Brothers
Second Round: Matches 13 & 14 (Tournament 29 & 30)
    Rhodes/Murdoch vs. Adams/Hernandez
    Sheik/Volkoff vs. Steamboat/Snuka
Second Round: Matches 15 & 16 (Tournament 31 & 32)
    Fantastics vs. Fabulous Ones
    Sheepherders vs. Freebirds


FIRST ROUND MATCHES

First Round: Matches 1 & 2
    Hennig/Blackwell vs. Mulligan/McDaniel
    Tyler/Whatley vs. Maharishi/Nagasaki
First Round: Matches 3 & 4
    Windham/Rotunda vs. Bockwinkel/Saito
    Rougeaus vs. Inoki/Sakaguchi
First Round: Matches 5 &6
    Barbarian/Graham vs. Hart Foundation (Hart/Neidhart)
    High Flyers (Brunzell/Gagne) vs. Savage/Poffo
First Round: Matches 7 & 8:
    The Von Erich vs. Blanchard/Abdullah the Butcher
    Tenryu/Tsuruta vs. The British Bulldogs
First Round: Matches 9 & 10:
    Graham/Blair vs. DiBiase/Williams
    Valiant/McGraw vs. Lawler/Dundee
First Round: Matches 11 & 12:
    Piper/Orton vs. Patterson/Fernandez
    Rock & Roll RPMs vs. Youngblood Brothers
First Round: Matches 13 and 14:
    Dynamic Duo (Gino & Chris) vs. American Starship
    Sawyer Bros. vs. Steamboat/Snuka
First Round: Matches 15 and 16
    Batten Twins vs. Fabulous Ones
    Weaver/Houston vs. Sheepherders

Friday, October 01, 2021

Poster: Johhny Valentine and Ric Flair Heat Up Lynchburg

by Brack Brasley
Mid-Atlantic Gateway Contributor

Lynchburg, VA was a regular stop on the Mid Atlantic Championship Wrestling circuit for so many years and this particular poster promotes a great card held on Saturday, August 23, 1975 in the City Armory.

The tag team main event featured the short lived but formidable team of Johnny Valentine and Ric Flair versus fan favorites Tim Woods and Paul Jones. The Fabulous Moolah also defended her Women's World Championship against Susan Green. It was billed as a "Ladies Title Match" although Moolah was anything but a lady the couple of times I saw her wrestle live in the late 70s.

The midcard match featured Tony Atlas White, as he was promoted at the beginning of his career anytime he wrestled near his hometown of Roanoke, VA.

With a vertical layout the poster has all black print over a light pink background and images of Valentine, Flair, Jones, Green, Moolah with her World title belt, and Danny Miller with the old Eastern States title around his waist. Peter's News Stand would have been your source for advance tickets.

As hot as it must have been on this August night in the Armory, I'm sure it was nothing compared to the heat Valentine, Flair, and Moolah were drawing.  

NO. 14 IN A SERIES

NWA World Champion Terry Funk